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Without tools completing a job would be impossible. Here most of the tools that you would need is listed here


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Tools

 
Tools
DIY is a rewarding pastime in more ways than one. Obviously, you will save money by not having to pay someone to do the work for you, and you will have the sense of achievement of doing it yourself. There's a lot to be said for being able to say 'I did that myself'. However, you should not forget that the experts have spent many years acquiring their skills, as well as having to purchase the required tools and equipment, and other overheads and expenses, so the prices that are charged are relative to all these things.
To be a competent DIY'er, there are things that you will need; you will need to know the procedure of how to do the job; this means gathering the information from sites like this, having the right tools, as well as knowing how to use them. When you start off, you should have at least a basic tool kit, comprising of good quality tools, and as you proceed over time, add to it, so that over time you could acquire everything required for any job.
You will notice that each job featured in the Project section of this site has a handy list of tools you require for that particular job, so that you could buy just these tools to start off with for that one job.
Tool Box    
The tools should be kept together in a single tool box, so that when you come to do a job, you will have the required tools in place. Ideally the box should be of metal or strong plastic material. It should be long enough to carry your saw with compartments for different tools such as screw drivers, chisels, wood bits and so forth.
As part of the training in Carpentry and Joinery, a wooden tool box is made. The corner joints are dovetailed, drawers are made, as well as a compartment for saws. It is then painted black. This is a good thing for the trainee to do, as well as actually making the box with all its joints and techniques, he or she ends up with a tool box to use.
Portable work bench    
A portable work bench should also consider which you will find indispensable. Some of these units are very versatile indeed, and will provide most things that you need of a bench. Many fold for easy storage, and are low weight, making them ideal for easy storage. With adjustable jaws, the work-piece can be gripped and held in position while being sawn, drilled or planed. Look too for the dual height feature, which allows it to be at good height work bench, as well as the low setting for use as a saw bench.
Claw Hammer    
A claw hammer is a tool primarily used for knocking in and extricating nails. A claw hammer is associated with woodworking because of the claw. Other types of hammers exist that is not to do with woodworking such as engineering hammers.
Every woodworker should have at least one claw hammer in their tool kit. Hammers are made in different weights for different jobs from knocking in panel pins to the largest nails. The most popular hammer weights are between 16 and 24 oz. The weight of the hammer consists of the weight of the head only not the handle. A 12-oz hammer is known as a pin hammer and can be used for driving small panel pins and tacks. The 20-ounce model is usually considered to be the most versatile, heavy enough to drive large nails and yet strong enough to be able to extract bent nails. Because pulling nails puts a lot of strain on the handle, choose either fibreglass or better still a one piece steel hammer. A good hammer is well balanced, with a rubber or similar grip that feels good and comfortable in your hand, and be able to absorb the shock of continues pounding in of nails.
Chisels    
Though there are many kinds of chisels available for different jobs, we will for this subject be focusing on just two; the Bevel edge, and the Firma.
If your chisels or plane is not sharp, you will be adding difficulties to your ability of woodworking. Chisels are very efficient in use, but only when sharp. When new, chisels have the blades ground to an angle of 25 degrees, which should then be sharpened or honed ready for use at 30 degrees to provide a stronger cutting tip. However, sharpening a chisel is a practice that takes some time to master, and if done incorrectly could ruin the cutting edge, which would then mean re-grinding. To help in the initial stage of use, you could use a honing guide, which maintains the correct set angle for honing wood chisels and planes, and used with an oilstone or diamond stone. There are two types of this method available on the market.
Care should always be taking when using sharp tools, by keeping your body and hands behind the blade.
Firmer chisels    
The firmer chisel has a rectangular section blade, which make them stronger than the beveled edge. They are used for tough and heavier work. Not as widely used as the bevel edge, and rarely used in the DIY world, as they are more popular on site work.
Bevel edged chisel     
The bevel edged chisel has as the name suggests beveled edges to the blade, this makes them easy to work in tight corners, and is by far the most popular chisel for DIY world.
The Hand Saw    
The wood saw has been in existence for thousands of years, and one would think that by now some device would have been invented to replace it. But despite the introduction of numerous power wood cutting tools, there still a place for a range of handsaws in today's tool kit. This is because the handsaw cannot be beaten for control, simplicity of use and accuracy in many circumstances. Though there are many different handsaws available, there are two distinctive types, the one to cut with the grain (ripping), or across it (crosscutting). Today the DIY person would rarely use the ripsaw, as timber is available in a variety of widths. For the odd occasions when it is required to rip saw timber, a crosscut saw is used, which, although not quite made for the job, is adequate. Alternatively, a portable or table circular can be used. The teeth of a saw are a continues line of sharp, cutting edges, with the exact size, angle, and shape of the teeth varying between saws depending on the type of cut required. Generally speaking then, variation in saws are represented by the number of teeth point that there are very 25.4mm/1" inch, and the angle of the individual tooth pitch.
Ripsaw    
As the name suggests, Ripsaws are designed to cut with the grain, the teeth of a ripsaw are like a row of chisels, each used to cut a fibre of wood as they travel with the grain. The teeth are large compared with other types of saws, usually with only 4 to 5 points per inch, with a blade length of 26".
Panel Saw    
The wood saw has been in existence for thousands of years, and one would think that by now some device would have been invented to replace it. But despite the introduction of numerous power wood cutting tools, there still a place for a range of handsaws in today's tool kit. This is because the handsaw cannot be beaten for control, simplicity of use and accuracy in many circumstances. Though there are many different handsaws available, there are two distinctive types, the one to cut with the grain (ripping), or across it (crosscutting). Today the DIY person would rarely use the ripsaw, as timber is available in a variety of widths. For the odd occasions when it is required to rip saw timber, a crosscut saw is used, which, although not quite made for the job, is adequate. Alternatively, a portable or table circular can be used. The teeth of a saw are a continues line of sharp, cutting edges, with the exact size, angle, and shape of the teeth varying between saws depending on the type of cut required. Generally speaking then, variation in saws is represented by the number of teeth point there are very 25.4mm/1inch, and the angle of the individual tooth pitch.
Tenon Saw    
The tenon saw is a popular saw, and because of its small size easily carried in the tool box. Used for fine cuts, they have either steel, or brass backed blade that gives the saw its weight, which is useful when sawing, as the weight of the saw along with the forward sawing motion allows the saw to cut relatively easily. The standard measurements for tenon saws rang from 8" to 14", with between 12 to 15 points per inch. For finer work use a dovetail saw which have very fine teeth 22 to 24 points per inch, and measuring 8" to 10" inches.
Coping saw    
Designed for cutting shapes in thin plywood and timber such as scribing cuts to skirting board. The saw uses replaceable blades, which when fitted are tensioned by turning the saw's handle. The blade can also be altered to change direction according to the angles of the wood by loosening the handle. Different to many other hand tools, the coping saw is versatile in use. The coping saw cuts on the pull stroke.
Hard Point saws    
Modern handsaws have hardened teeth to prolong their useful life.  Hard Point saws cannot be sharpened once they have worn to particular precaution should be taken with these.; these saws are, to an extent, 'throwaway' tools as they cannot be easily sharpened when they become blunt. Hardpoint saws which have more rigid teeth and blades are designed for the purpose of cutting wood, man made boards, insulation, plastic and some building blocks.
Pad Saw    
Also known as a keyhole saw. Although intended primarily for cutting the straight sides of a keyhole, it can be used for any internal cut, straight or curved. The blade is adjustable in its projection from the handle, the idea being to enable it to be given as little projection as is consistent with the required stroke. The saw necessarily relies upon the stiffness of the blade to prevent it from buckling, but buckling can easily happen because of the narrowness of the blade. The projection of the blade should always be kept to a minimum.
Screw Drivers    
No matter what job you are doing, you will more than likely need a screwdriver.  The screwdriver is designed for inserting and tightening screws, not forgetting, taking them out too. Using the wrong type or size of screwdriver, will cause frustration, and damage to the screw head and the screwdriver.  The screwdriver tip fits into the screw head, and depending on the type of screws used, there is a screwdriver to match it. There are three main types which are used within the DIY world; the slotted, Philips, and Pozidrive, of which there are different sizes, large medium and small. So as to meet every eventuality, you would need these three different sizes for each type of screws.
Combination Square    
A try square is used by resting it up to the edge of the timber, and marking a 90 degree, or 45 degree line across its face. It can also be used to check if the face and edge are at 90 degrees (square) to each other. Different to a try square, which has a fixed 90 degree angle, the combination square is much more versatile in use. As well as being able to reliably measure 90 and 45 degree angles, the blade can also be use as a rule. Because the body can slide along the blade, it can be adjusted to any length along the blade, which is handy if working to a restricted or confined area such as a rebate.
Nail Punch    
A nail punch is made of solid steel, and used for driving the head of nails below the surface, allowing filler to be inserted into the wood thereby hiding the existence of the nails. Some have a serrated finish as shown hear on the left, while others have a plastic grip. Nail punches are made in a variety of sizes to match different nail sizes, from be fine tip for use with panel pins to large tips for large nails. Ideally, a full set should be part of the tool kit.
Marking Gauge    
A marking gauge is used to cut a line parallel to the face side and/or face edge of the work-piece and is extremely important tool for marking parallel lines and preparing for marking for hinges for example. They are usually made from beech or rosewood and the thumbscrew from yellow plastic or knurled brass, or as with the early models, a brass screw. The better quality gauges also have brass inserts at the front of the stock, which prevents wear as it is pushed against the surface of the wood and allows for smooth action.
The pin is made from hardened steel and is the part that cuts the line (that is the scribe) into the surface of the wood. The distance between the stock and the pin is adjusted by loosening the thumbscrew which allows the stock to slide along the stem.
Spirit Level    
Spirit levels are made in many different lengths, and are used by many different trades. The size usually used by Joiners is 24" /600mm, which is ideal for levelling the head of a door casing when fitting; anything longer would not fit a standard door opening width, it's also a handy size that fits in the tool box, and for use within confined spaces. Because spirit levels are used to accurately check the surface for being horizontal (level), and vertical (plumb), the accuracy of the spirit level itself is essential. Many of the well known brands are quite expensive when compared to cheaper versions, but do the job that they are designed for. Most spirit levels are slightly out of true, but the error of the quality item is well within the acceptable tolerances.
Brace    
With the increased use of power and cordless tools, the brace and bit is not used as often as it used to. This does not mean that it is not up to the job, on the contrary, the brace and sharp bits are capable of boring out good and accurate holes. In fact it could be said that they can be more accurate in use than the power tools, as they give full control in use, especially with the larger diameter bits. So don't dismiss them as a thing of the past just yet.
Measuring Tape    
A good quality tape measure is essential part of any tool kit, and has many advantages over the original wooden rule. The best type to have is the wide blade version, as they can be extended out further than the narrower versions without kinking and dropping. The wider blades are also much easier to read. Tape measures can also be extended into inaccessible areas that you cannot reach, under base units, and behind wall units. The blades are also able to span great distances, and be locked in position.
Pinchers    
The pinchers is another great little tool to have, as you will find that there are numerous occasions that you will find a need for them in the course of doing a job. They are used for removing tacks and small nails out of wood, and to help raise the head of a nail which would otherwise be inaccessible to the claw hammer. I find too that they are hand for turning small screw, where the head has been damaged and cannot be turned using a screwdriver.
Countersink Bit    
The counter bit is used for boring out a 'v' shaped recess into the surface of wood, so that the head of the screw can fit flush, or below the surface. They are made in various sizes that match the different gauges of screw sizes.
Block Plane    
The block plane is the small version of the other types of larger wood planes. They are easily used using just one hand if required, and used mainly for chamfering the corner of timber, such as the edge of a door prior to sanding. They are lightweight in use, and can work closer into a corner or floor than the larger planes. An essential part of the tool kit, and easily stored in the tool box.
Smoothing Plane    
The Smoothing Plane is a good all rounder plane, and ideal for all general use work. It's a handy size, though weighty, it's not too heavy in use. Able to handle most jobs, it's the ideal plane to have. The only real drawback is that when planing the longer length, such as an edge of the door, it is not ideal for maintaining a true flat surface. In such cases, the longer body Jack plane should be used.

 

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